Developing your own Teaching Portfolio

 

Example - Teaching Materials

 
     
 

The key questions to be answered are:

1. What teaching materials do I use?
2. Why do I use these materials?
3. How do these materials help my teaching and my students' learning?

This section provides an opportunity for you to display work and materials which you have developed in connection with your teaching. These materials should not only represent what you have done in relation to teaching, they should also demonstrate how your aims and philosophy of teaching have been put into practice.

The following is an example of a possible portfolio entry.

 
 

Teaching Materials

Before teaching a subject, I always prepare a reading list together with "focus questions" which I give to the students about two weeks before class contact (an example of such a reading list is attached in the appendix). This list suggests some of the most pertinent reading about the subject, and it includes both text books and reference materials. The students are expected to read these materials upon which discussion in class will be based.

I have tried this reading list for two years. The effect was not too encouraging at first as many of the students did not do their pre-reading due to either heavy workload, or they did not see the usefulness of doing pre-reading. After talking with the students, the list and its preparation were modified taking the following into consideration.

  • Only the most pertinent sources are selected, with the relevant sections identified
  • Sources were selected which students have easy access to
  • Relevant questions are identified which help student focus their thinking during reading. These questions also form the basis of discussion during class

The modified reading list is more successful as more students are now able to manage doing at least part of the pre-reading. Particularly when the follow-up class is structured in the form of problem-based learning based on the questions identified in the list, students are finding the pre-reading useful in helping them solve the problems during class discussion.